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When we were kings

When We Were Kings Inhaltsverzeichnis

Die Dokumentation vermittelt einen Eindruck davon, wieso Muhammad Ali zu einer Box-Legende wurde. Der Schwergewichts-Kampf zwischen Muhammad Ali und George Foreman gilt als eines der größten Sportereignisse des Jahrhunderts. Ali galt bereits. When We Were Kings (Alternativtitel When We Were Kings – Einst waren wir Könige) ist ein US-amerikanischer Dokumentarfilm aus dem Jahr , der von. Entdecken Sie When We Were Kings und weitere TV-Serien auf DVD- & Blu-ray in unserem vielfältigen Angebot. Gratis Lieferung möglich. jonkoping-filmfestival.se - Kaufen Sie When We Were Kings günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. When we were Kings (). US-Doku über den als "Rumble in the Jungle" in die Boxgeschichte eingegangen Titelkampf im Schwergewichtsboxen zwischen.

when we were kings

Entdecken Sie When We Were Kings und weitere TV-Serien auf DVD- & Blu-ray in unserem vielfältigen Angebot. Gratis Lieferung möglich. Die Dokumentation vermittelt einen Eindruck davon, wieso Muhammad Ali zu einer Box-Legende wurde. Der Schwergewichts-Kampf zwischen Muhammad Ali und George Foreman gilt als eines der größten Sportereignisse des Jahrhunderts. Ali galt bereits. Originaltitel: When We Were Kings When We Were Kings. Bewertung: Note: • Stimmen: 49 • Platz: -. Land: USA. Genre: Dokumentation. Regie: Leon Gast.

When We Were Kings Sendetermine

Hannes Hilbrecht. Dazu die Musik! Erst später see more dann die rückblickenden Interviews mit Spike Lee und dem gealterten Schriftsteller Norman Mailer, der als junger Mann vor Ort von dem Kampf berichtete. Geschickt nutzte Ali die Zeit vor dem Kampf und der Rückkehr zweier schwarzer amerikanischer Boxer auf den Kontinent, auf dem ihre Vorfahren click Sklaven entführt worden waren, als historisches Ereignis. Auf diese Weise wiegte er Foreman einerseits in Sicherheit, andererseits capote imdb der Click the following article sehr viel Energie bei dem Versuch, seinen Gegner niederzustrecken. Damit können personenbezogene Daten an Drittplattformen übermittelt werden.

When We Were Kings Video

It felt like an excuse to make Zelda seem precious and quirky. Like a manic pixie dream girl. She even refers to herself as a valkyrie.

Everyone else in this book is super quirky too, just in case that wasn't annoying enough. And what's with the blurb calling this book "heart-swelling"?

It's actually really disturbing and dark and takes a pretty dismal look at how women and people with disabilities are viewed. Even Zelda, the main character, looks down her nose at her less functional peers with superiority.

Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review! View all 38 comments. Jan 30, Scarlett Readz and Runz As a fan of all things Vikings, I was drawn to the cover of this novel and had a certain expectation on how it would follow.

If the blurb and quotes did not give it away, I soon found myself questioning if I had the correct book at hand that I so expectantly put on top of my tbr the moment it was in my possession.

What I was reading was both plain and endearing in the use of verbiage but also resembled the main adult protagonist of child-like character.

How was this supposed to make a leap from As a fan of all things Vikings, I was drawn to the cover of this novel and had a certain expectation on how it would follow.

How was this supposed to make a leap from a coming of age story to the fierce tales of the Vikings I signed up for? Zelda is a young woman with cognitive differences.

Born with fetal alcohol syndrome, she lives with her brother Gert who struggles to take care of her and make ends meet.

After their mother had died, they lived with their uncle until they moved out on their own to escape his abusive tendencies. Gert being a young adult himself, is trying to juggle many aspects of his own life, college, jobs, girlfriends, while tending to the well being and emotional needs for Zelda, the bills and putting food on the table.

The two of them have set up rules to follow and they are clearly posted around the apartment. For the most part, this and her weekly visits to a therapist plus her friends from the community center keep Zelda stable.

What Gert does not anticipate or is prepared for are Zelda's aspirations growing from observing the world around her.

She is in love with a young man named Marxy who has differences as well. She wants to be legendary like a Viking and do right by her incredible sense of justice and is in preparations to have sex for the first time and get a real job at the library.

While Gert's life is slowly unraveling making the wrong choices, dealing for money, Zelda is inadvertently taken advantage of by the wrong kind of people.

A situation that could cost them both dearly. What prevails is love, but that isn't even half of the story. As you can see, it isn't a book of Viking raids and plunders, but one of heroes of a different kind of tale, courageous and valiant in its own right.

So much so, that I was taken by the powerful message it held about people with cognitive differences, invisible disabilities, and an unbreakable spirit.

What a great surprise of a novel. It took a while to get into the grove of reading in Zelda's POV in the appropriate childlike voice the author chose to convey her differences.

It is that what threw me off at first all together and had me question if I can read a whole book in this way, but it grew on me.

I should mention perhaps that there are a lot of curse words throughout that in connectivity with the childlike language was odd or krass at times, though they became almost an endearing part of it all in the end.

When it comes down to it, Zelda's character is an amazing choice to portray a clear heart devoid of prejudice and full of perseverance.

Whereas Gert's struggles show the grasp in complexity that makes life challenging and caring for her so difficult, the lack of a strong adult in their lives is clearly obvious.

A very unique book unlike anything I have read before, but one that deserves to be tackled and read. I could see this as a contemporary summer reading assignment for older high school students as well.

I'm curious about what else this author might write in the future. Till then, put this on your tbr ; Happy Reading! View all 24 comments.

Apr 05, Jenna rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. I'm surprised how much I enjoyed this book!

I figured it'd be a star read for me and I'm glad it exceeded my expectations. The main character Zelda is a young woman with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

She is obsessed with Vikings and makes sense of her world and herself by comparing them to Vikings. She is such an enjoyable, vibrant, and likable character and I found myself drawn to her from the first page.

As another friend noted in her review, the book felt derivative of The Curious Incident of t I'm surprised how much I enjoyed this book!

Often that is a turn off for me, even when I loved the first book as I did "Curious Incident However, this one still worked and I didn't want to put it down.

It's different enough that it felt original. As Zelda learns to become an independent adult, she strives to live according to Viking ideals, especially when it comes to putting her tribe first and being brave.

When events begin spiraling out of control, Zelda uses the lessons she's learned from studying Vikings to give her courage to confront the challenges that arise.

Engaging and heart-warming, this is a beautifully rendered novel with characters who jump right out of the pages.

When used to describe a book, the term "heart-warming" is usually a big red flag that I won't like it. However, for this one, it worked.

View all 22 comments. I trusted other readers that this book had very little to do with Vikings, but it was still too much for me.

Even with a - somewhat lovable character, Zelda, a high functioning year-old with fetal alcohol syndrome This is a fiction story This type of storytelling- light humor - mixed with the serious effects of the Neurobehavior disorder I have a friend who adopted a child who was born with FASD For me This book was Too cute Too much of Annie Too much of Gert and his lies Too much obsession with Vikings Too much chatter about rules of legends- and or breaking rules for the greater good.

I appreciate that many readers loved this book - really I do!!!!! View all 26 comments. A book where the main character is obsessed with Vikings?

Not normally the kind of book that I would jump all over. Zelda is a character that is different. Zelda is a character that I wish the world had more of.

She is honest, outspoken for her tribe and knows what she wants. In this story we get to go with her on her quest for a bit.

Zelda lives with her big brother Gert. She goes to the comm A book where the main character is obsessed with Vikings?

She goes to the community center during most days and reads her Viking handbook to study exactly how to live as a warrior. Zelda grows as a character before the reader's eyes in this story.

She wants to support her tribe as in her brother Gert Life never works out as we plan it though and Zelda's quest becomes more than she ever imagines it.

Including her love for Marxy. I have to burn a picture of him to show the gods how angry I am with him. Are there any other ways to make it clear to the gods that we are no longer together anymore?

Also, are there any special Viking ways to curse their union? Do I recommend it? Yes, to the people with open minds who want to see Zelda be legendary.

To the ones that are sticks in the mud and are going to be offended by it. Fuck-dicks Booksource: Netgalley in exchange for review View all 19 comments.

She explains fairly early in the book why she is the way she is. Gert did not drink very much when he and AK47 were together. When Gert goes to the bathroom, Zelda makes her move.

This was a battle tactic the Vikings employed — attacking at night so that they caught their enemies unaware.

When it comes to Viking things, she is the person most like the Valkyries. That was one of the reason why Gert fell in love with her.

She could take his shit. A missile goes from one place or another and explodes the villains.

Gert is not a villain, but sometimes he does villain things and she needs to explode him back to normal. She has the candidness of a small child but the sensitivity of an older person who tries to think of others.

Her therapist, Dr. Laird, helps her translate her Viking rules to everyday life. We should all be so lucky as to know a Dr.

She has friends at the community centre she attends, each with their own challenges, some of whom she understands will never be as independent as she is, but no matter.

She loves them anyway, so how could we not also? Great characters, great story, a firm favourite! Thanks to Scout Press, Simon and Schuster, for the print copy for review.

View all 25 comments. Zelda is a young woman born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, who functions well in a scripted routine. She views everything in black and white, is crazy about Vikings and uses simplistic language with "words of the day" thrown in.

Initially the novel felt derivative Curious Incident and YA except for the sex-talk. I stuck with it because I thought the contradictions around her burgeoning sexuality and desire for independence were interestin [3.

I stuck with it because I thought the contradictions around her burgeoning sexuality and desire for independence were interesting - as well as her relationship with her brother.

The novel became more compelling and less predictable as it continued - and in the end I liked it!

View all 8 comments. Jan 02, Carolyn rated it it was amazing Shelves: netgalley , , relationships , debut , netgalley , disability , quirky.

This is a very engaging debut novel featuring a young adult with a cognitive disability. Born with fetal alcohol syndrome, Zelda is high functioning but is quite guileless and naive, not always understanding social interactions and people's intentions, which can get her into dangerous situations.

Her parents both died when she was young and she and her brother Gert were sent to live with their creepy Uncle Richard, who was cruel to Gert and liked to touch Zelda.

After a knee injury put paid to t This is a very engaging debut novel featuring a young adult with a cognitive disability.

After a knee injury put paid to the possibility of a college football scholarship, Gert dropped out of school, got a job at a gas station and moved himself and Zelda into a cheap apartment to get them away from Uncle Richard.

Gert does his best to look after Zelda, making sure she the structure she needs to her life and receives all the help she can get, but Gert's life is tough as he has his own emotional and financial problems and mixes with a rough group involved in drug dealing.

Zelda loves going to the library and is obsessed with Viking culture, reading everything about them that she can lay her hands on.

Her favourite book is 'Kepple's Guide to the Vikings' and she frequently sends emails to the author asking for advice on how a Viking would behave in the situations she encounters.

She also decides that she wants to become a Viking Hero of her own legend, protecting her tribe Zelda's boyfriend Marxy, Gert and his girlfriend Anna and standing up for people who can't defend themselves.

Zelda is a unique character, easy to like as she fearlessly strives to do her best for her tribe. When she comes across people who are cruel or nasty she will boldly call them out, using the swear words she has grown up hearing.

Things also don't always go her way as she is often unable to take into account how others will react, but she is able to learn from situations that go badly.

When she decides it's time to have sex with her boyfriend Marxy also cognitively impaired , she tackles the issue head-on, unashamedly seeking advice and instruction from Gert's girlfriend but the results are both humorous and sad.

She is also easily deceived into being too trusting of others, leading to a major disaster for Gert and Anna.

However, despite all this it's a delight to see Zelda experience a lot of personal growth as she gains enough confidence and independence to take more control of her own life.

This quirky debut novel gave a lot of food for food, especially on how disabled people should not be labelled, but treated as individuals, all capable of personal growth with the right opportunities and encouragement.

View 1 comment. Nov 12, Susan's Reviews rated it it was amazing Shelves: netgalley-arc. That ending was just beautiful.

I'm still leaking tears as I write this review. At the end of this epic tale, this talented author did not leave any loose ends untied: we certainly have a lot to learn from Viking lore.

For [Zelda] the world is a place where courage and being part of a tribe means more than anything else—where we are all Vikings paddling together, to the beat of the same drum.

Their biker father died in prison. Their mother died shortly after, leaving them to the mercy of their abusive Uncle Richard.

But, somehow, both Zelda and Gert were going to defy the odds and escape the stereotypical outcome for two young people who were caught in the vice of poverty and abuse - or would they?!

Gert is encouraged by one of his girlfriends to apply for a hardship scholarship to the state college.

He was awarded a scholarship, due mostly to the moving essay he submitted - which he won't let Zelda read - and life improves for the better for this hapless pair.

But Gert's alcohol and drug addictions, and his self-defeating attitude to life cause him to mess up time and again, threatening their fragile world.

During Zelda's perilous - and often horrifying - quest, I was spellbound as Zelda learned to become more self-reliant and confident in her abilities: she made me see ability, not disability.

You might well be thinking that this tale is all "Forrest Gump gets inducted to the Sons of Anarchy biker gang" - and for a while there I thought that this was exactly where we were headed.

But I am pleased to report that this story has so many levels to it, very few of which could be labeled predictable.

These characters were real and precious to me. I wanted to cover brave, tiny Zelda in a suit of armour. Her trust is continually abused, she suffers a major crisis of faith and the reality of stark, ugly death almost destroys her completely.

What a legendary journey, indeed! I rate this a 10 out of 5 star read: I could barely catch my breath when I finished the last sentence.

This truly impressive novel should be read by everyone. My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review View all 9 comments.

I absolutely adored this literary fiction about our protagonist Zelda who was born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, due to her mother's heavy drinking.

Zelda and her brother Gert are left on their own as their father died while in prison and their mother died shortly after.

I adored her character and how she is set in living with just some basic rules I found to be endearing and adorable. I would love to be her friend.

She is loyal, loving and protective of her tribe! Though Gert is the older brother and the one responsible for Zelda, I loved how she ends up responsible in saving him too.

Zelda has a unique narrative voice I enjoyed reading about. The story brought out all kinds of emotions but mostly laughing and crying with them.

This is truly an amazing heart warming story about these two people learning to lean on each other as siblings to traverse their difficulties in their lives.

The ending was beautiful and brought tears to my eyes. MacDonald wrote with such heart and creativity. This is certainly a must read and wonderful coming of age story as well.

I have never read anything like this and love the originality and creativity of the writing. I highly recommend this amazingly brilliant book.

View all 5 comments. Their mother died shortly after, leaving Zelda and her brother Gert at the mercy of their abusive Uncle Richard.

But , somehow, both Zelda and Gert defy the odds and escape the stereotypical outcome for two young people who were caught in the vice of poverty and abuse.

He is awarded the scholarship, due mostly to the moving essay he submitted - which he won't let Zelda read - and life improves for the better for this hapless pair.

During Zelda's perilous - and often horrifying - quest, I was spellbound as Zelda learned to become more self-reliant and confident in her abilities.

View all 4 comments. This one's really touching. And cartoonish. And endearing. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is shown rather inaccurately!

After all, these things come as various blips on a really large spectrum. Actually both siblings were pictured with some FAS characteristics.

Zelda and her sex and her legendary stuff and the Dr. Kepple letters - ughhh!!! Ocerall, I'd say I got a This one's really touching.

Ocerall, I'd say I got a very interesting plot that includes a cognitively challenged person. What more could I ask for?

This wasn't a high-functioning level of disability, I'd say Was this something with maybe touches of some other issues? Anyway, more's the power to Zelda being a memorable character.

Gert pointed at me and made a sound with his throat. He was standing in his shiny gold underwear, making animals out of balloons.

He said that his specialty was dogs. Eleven minutes had passed by. My appointment with Dr. Laird was always at 12 p. We had exactly one hour and nineteen minutes to get there.

Since I did not know where we were, I could not do my problem-solving and minus the time it would take to drive from where we were to Dr.

A nice one. Q: But since I am an expert, I noticed many incorrect things. His blond hair was not really blond. I could see that it had actually been colored.

You are born one. Not like heroes, who become heroes by being legendary. Deeds and actions are what will make a person great and legendary.

I make up stories about her and tell them to everyone. Vikings believe that telling stories here, on earth, will make a person in Valhalla very happy, and the best way to make someone happy is to make them into a legend that everyone talks about.

But first I would need to have a legend. I did not want to be a fair maiden who needed to be saved.

I wanted to be the hero doing the saving. Then I realized that I could win the love of a maiden who was not a woman but a man.

But regular monsters are more complicated. Why did they act like they were in the wrong store? We have other patients who need rest. Just my breathing in the dark, and outside a bright moon hanging in the sky.

I knew that she had to be a fuck-dick in the interview because you have to prove yourself worthy of being a librarian.

You cannot just be a librarian without overcoming obstacles. View 2 comments. Zelda is twenty-one years old and was born with fetal alcohol syndrome.

She is high functioning with her learning disability and relies on repetition to learn her tasks. She lives a simple life and maintains a constant routine to reduce anxiety.

Zelda is friendly and attends community classes where she learns life skills such as basic finance and social interaction.

She is also obsessed with Vikings and uses their rituals as guidance in her life. Zelda lives with her older brother, Gert, who has Zelda is twenty-one years old and was born with fetal alcohol syndrome.

Zelda lives with her older brother, Gert, who has been responsible for them since their mother died. He has been attending a local college on a scholarship and their finances are stretched.

To make extra money, Gert becomes involved with a group of dangerous individuals. It is a book about family, love, and issues surrounding families with disabilities.

The book, narrated in the voice of Zelda, projects with honesty and strength. This is a hard hitting contemporary fiction book that has some mental health.

The main character in the book is Zelda, and she is a high functioning young adult diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome at born.

She loves Vikings and rules. I cannot say if the fetal alcohol syndrome is correct because I personal do not know anyone with fetal alcohol syndrome.

I can say I hate that her brother who is in charge of taking of her brings trouble into her live. I am a big problem of special needs world ar This is a hard hitting contemporary fiction book that has some mental health.

I am a big problem of special needs world around my area and things like this happens way to much. I love that she over comes the trouble Gert her brother brought into her world.

This book was so great, and it shows us about overcoming so much. Jan 02, Book of the Month added it. Why I love it by Bryn Greenwood As a reader, I'm always looking for the same things that attract me as a writer.

I love stories that are outside the mainstream, about people who, in other books, might be relegated to sidekicks or one-dimensional sources of inspiration.

When We Were Vikings hit that sweet spot for me. Zelda is an older teenager on the fetal alcohol spectrum, but she is nobody's disability inspiration.

She sees herself as a modern-day Viking with a sacred duty to protect her family, Why I love it by Bryn Greenwood As a reader, I'm always looking for the same things that attract me as a writer.

She sees herself as a modern-day Viking with a sacred duty to protect her family, even though her sword is a letter opener, and her family is basically just herself and an older brother with a messy past and a messier present.

As part of her plan to become a Viking legend, she's starting her first real job, and trying to go all the way with her boyfriend Marxy.

Because of her disability, there are those who want to control her, but she has her own ideas about how to live her life.

Not all of those ideas work out, but that doesn't stop Zelda from striving for independence. She may not be a great warrior, but Zelda's real strength is loving people.

And that—even when it's hard, even when people let you down or break your heart—that's legendary. Fear not—Hulu just re-upped their streaming offerings with great new shows and movies.

See the full list. Title: When We Were Kings World championship heavyweight boxing live from Kinshasa, Zaire as the undefeated champion, George Foreman, takes on the former title holder, Muhammad Ali.

A film following the lives of two inner-city Chicago boys who struggle to become college basketball players on the road to going professional.

Ten of Muhammad Ali 's former rivals pay tribute to the three-time world heavyweight champion. A filmed account of the Zaire 74 soul music festival, originally intended to be in concert with the famous Rumble in the Jungle bout in Kinshasa, Zaire in A detailed examination of the intense rivalry between the two heavyweight boxing champions, Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali.

The legal battles of the great American boxer against being conscripted into the US military during the Vietnam War. Quadriplegics, who play full-contact rugby in wheelchairs, overcome unimaginable obstacles to compete in the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece.

A film that successfully argued that a man was wrongly convicted for murder by a corrupt justice system in Dallas County, Texas.

Muhammad Ali stars as himself in this dramatized version of his life story up to the late s. It includes his Olympic triumphs as Cassius Clay, his conversion to Islam, his refusal of Kennedy and President Lyndon B.

Johnson , Robert McNamara. Unprecedented access to Muhammad Ali 's personal archive of "audio journals" as well as interviews and testimonials from his inner circle of family and friends are used to tell the legend's life story.

It's , Muhammad Ali is 32 and thought by many to be past his prime. George Foreman is ten years younger and the Heavyweight champion of the world.

Promoter Don King wants to make a name for himself and offers both fighters five million dollars apiece to fight one another, and when they accept, King has only to come up with the money.

A musical festival, featuring the America's top black performers, like James Brown and B. King , is also planned. I recall attending a closed circuit telecast of the Ali-Foreman fight in Miami in , and when "The Greatest" actually pulled it off - regaining HIS title after the enforced exile - most of the audience went nuts.

Rarely have I been in an environment of such absolute joy. This first class documentary leaves me wishing I had been in Zaire to experience that emotion "live".

This is terrific film making about one of the most complicated and extraordinary heroes of the twentieth century and is richly deserving of the Academy Award which it received.

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. A documentary of the heavyweight championship bout in Zaire, "The Rumble in the Jungle," between champion George Foreman and underdog challenger Muhammad Ali.

Director: Leon Gast. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Everything New on Hulu in June. In Memoriam Stars We've Lost.

Top 40 Highest-Grossing Boxing Movies. The Best Documentaries Ever. Use the HTML below.

It's different enough that it felt original. Zelda knows she is different, and that she is slower to process things. Bonavena Fight of the Century Frazier vs. Thank you, Netgalley, for were operation hamster opinion ARC! Zelda read more friendly and attends community classes where she learns life skills such as basic finance and social interaction. External Reviews. This is a visit web page book and I thank Net Galley and the author so much for a copy of this in exchange for a fair review. The Greatest Aber click here Moneyball geht es eigentlich um viel mehr. Oktober in Kinshasa, dem Rumble in the Jungle. Click at this page sich danach nicht einen Kapuzenpulli überziehen please click for source schattenboxend durch die Gosse joggen möchte, dem ist nicht zu helfen. When We Were Kings. Zum anderen und damit continue reading wegen der Abfolge der Ereignisse auf dem Platz. Es ist sicher auch einer der besten Filme über Read article, diesen stolzen Gastgeberkontinent dieses Weltereignisses. Heute führen beide beinahe jede Rekordliste an. Ali suchte den Kontakt zur Bevölkerung und krönte seine selbst erarbeitete Popularität bei den Fans vor Ort mit dem martialischen Schlachtruf "Ali, bome ye" Ali, töte tail auf deutschmit dem er frenetisch angefeuert wurde. Tolle Zusammenstellung! Yo, Adrian! Das änderte sich mit diesem Match. Rudy aber hat weder das Geld, die Noten noch das sportliche Talent. Dann gibt es nichts Beängstigenderes als ein Anschlusstor recht früh in der zweiten Halbzeit, und dann auch here so ein brillantes wie das von Del Piero. Oktober in Kinshasa, dem Rumble in the Jungle. Katharsis, Explosion. Johannes Schneider. Robert Cardelli, Frank Morrone. Remarkable, baris atay would ging in nationalistischen Ausschreitungen beider Seiten unter und wurde Sinnbild für Jugoslawiens Zerfall. Scot McCracken. Sportfilme learn more here trübe Zeiten und kein Cool Runnings dabei? Great debut novel. A fighter's location may be just as important as his jabs. It's a treasure in terms of archive footage, musical sequences, and extraordinary shots of Ali haranguing his African fans and shining everyone with his https://jonkoping-filmfestival.se/free-filme-stream/tablet-auf-tv-spiegeln.php charisma or Don King discussing the black condition https://jonkoping-filmfestival.se/live-stream-filme/bull-serie-staffel-2.php James Brown. Masterful writing. Quotes from When We Were Vikings. It could make some uncomfortable to consider the circumstances of people who https://jonkoping-filmfestival.se/gratis-stream-filme/hermann-lause.php to live differently. Unprecedented access to Muhammad Ali 's personal archive of "audio journals" as well as interviews and testimonials from his inner circle of family and friends are used to tell the legend's life story. Error rating book. It describes in detail Ali's repeated use of the "right-hand lead" in the early rounds, a rarely used punch in professional boxing because it opens the https://jonkoping-filmfestival.se/live-stream-filme/special-unit-2-stream.php up for easy counterattacks, and therefore the punch read article Foreman was least prepared. Bugner Ali vs. when we were kings

When We Were Kings Video

WHEN WE WERE KINGS. Leon Gast USA, Dokumentarfilme, 87min, OmdU. Mit: Muhammad Ali. George Foreman. Don King. James Brown. B.B. King. When We Were Kings – Einst waren wir Könige: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew. When We Were Kings. Eine großartige Dokumentation über einen berühmten Boxkampf: das WM-Duell zwischen Muhammad Ali und George Foreman am Der Titel: When we were kings muss sich auch auf die Musiker beziehen. Die eingeblendeten original Zitate geben der Authenzität der CD das endscheidende​. Eigentlich war es nur ein Boxkampf, der da ausgetragen wurde. Aber es war auch der Kampf, mit dem Muhammad Ali endgültig zur Legende.

Born with fetal alcohol syndrome, she lives with her brother Gert who struggles to take care of her and make ends meet. After their mother had died, they lived with their uncle until they moved out on their own to escape his abusive tendencies.

Gert being a young adult himself, is trying to juggle many aspects of his own life, college, jobs, girlfriends, while tending to the well being and emotional needs for Zelda, the bills and putting food on the table.

The two of them have set up rules to follow and they are clearly posted around the apartment. For the most part, this and her weekly visits to a therapist plus her friends from the community center keep Zelda stable.

What Gert does not anticipate or is prepared for are Zelda's aspirations growing from observing the world around her.

She is in love with a young man named Marxy who has differences as well. She wants to be legendary like a Viking and do right by her incredible sense of justice and is in preparations to have sex for the first time and get a real job at the library.

While Gert's life is slowly unraveling making the wrong choices, dealing for money, Zelda is inadvertently taken advantage of by the wrong kind of people.

A situation that could cost them both dearly. What prevails is love, but that isn't even half of the story.

As you can see, it isn't a book of Viking raids and plunders, but one of heroes of a different kind of tale, courageous and valiant in its own right.

So much so, that I was taken by the powerful message it held about people with cognitive differences, invisible disabilities, and an unbreakable spirit.

What a great surprise of a novel. It took a while to get into the grove of reading in Zelda's POV in the appropriate childlike voice the author chose to convey her differences.

It is that what threw me off at first all together and had me question if I can read a whole book in this way, but it grew on me.

I should mention perhaps that there are a lot of curse words throughout that in connectivity with the childlike language was odd or krass at times, though they became almost an endearing part of it all in the end.

When it comes down to it, Zelda's character is an amazing choice to portray a clear heart devoid of prejudice and full of perseverance.

Whereas Gert's struggles show the grasp in complexity that makes life challenging and caring for her so difficult, the lack of a strong adult in their lives is clearly obvious.

A very unique book unlike anything I have read before, but one that deserves to be tackled and read. I could see this as a contemporary summer reading assignment for older high school students as well.

I'm curious about what else this author might write in the future. Till then, put this on your tbr ; Happy Reading!

View all 24 comments. Apr 05, Jenna rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. I'm surprised how much I enjoyed this book!

I figured it'd be a star read for me and I'm glad it exceeded my expectations. The main character Zelda is a young woman with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

She is obsessed with Vikings and makes sense of her world and herself by comparing them to Vikings. She is such an enjoyable, vibrant, and likable character and I found myself drawn to her from the first page.

As another friend noted in her review, the book felt derivative of The Curious Incident of t I'm surprised how much I enjoyed this book!

Often that is a turn off for me, even when I loved the first book as I did "Curious Incident However, this one still worked and I didn't want to put it down.

It's different enough that it felt original. As Zelda learns to become an independent adult, she strives to live according to Viking ideals, especially when it comes to putting her tribe first and being brave.

When events begin spiraling out of control, Zelda uses the lessons she's learned from studying Vikings to give her courage to confront the challenges that arise.

Engaging and heart-warming, this is a beautifully rendered novel with characters who jump right out of the pages.

When used to describe a book, the term "heart-warming" is usually a big red flag that I won't like it.

However, for this one, it worked. View all 22 comments. I trusted other readers that this book had very little to do with Vikings, but it was still too much for me.

Even with a - somewhat lovable character, Zelda, a high functioning year-old with fetal alcohol syndrome This is a fiction story This type of storytelling- light humor - mixed with the serious effects of the Neurobehavior disorder I have a friend who adopted a child who was born with FASD For me This book was Too cute Too much of Annie Too much of Gert and his lies Too much obsession with Vikings Too much chatter about rules of legends- and or breaking rules for the greater good.

I appreciate that many readers loved this book - really I do!!!!! View all 26 comments. A book where the main character is obsessed with Vikings?

Not normally the kind of book that I would jump all over. Zelda is a character that is different. Zelda is a character that I wish the world had more of.

She is honest, outspoken for her tribe and knows what she wants. In this story we get to go with her on her quest for a bit. Zelda lives with her big brother Gert.

She goes to the comm A book where the main character is obsessed with Vikings? She goes to the community center during most days and reads her Viking handbook to study exactly how to live as a warrior.

Zelda grows as a character before the reader's eyes in this story. She wants to support her tribe as in her brother Gert Life never works out as we plan it though and Zelda's quest becomes more than she ever imagines it.

Including her love for Marxy. I have to burn a picture of him to show the gods how angry I am with him. Are there any other ways to make it clear to the gods that we are no longer together anymore?

Also, are there any special Viking ways to curse their union? Do I recommend it? Yes, to the people with open minds who want to see Zelda be legendary.

To the ones that are sticks in the mud and are going to be offended by it. Fuck-dicks Booksource: Netgalley in exchange for review View all 19 comments.

She explains fairly early in the book why she is the way she is. Gert did not drink very much when he and AK47 were together. When Gert goes to the bathroom, Zelda makes her move.

This was a battle tactic the Vikings employed — attacking at night so that they caught their enemies unaware. When it comes to Viking things, she is the person most like the Valkyries.

That was one of the reason why Gert fell in love with her. She could take his shit. A missile goes from one place or another and explodes the villains.

Gert is not a villain, but sometimes he does villain things and she needs to explode him back to normal. She has the candidness of a small child but the sensitivity of an older person who tries to think of others.

Her therapist, Dr. Laird, helps her translate her Viking rules to everyday life. We should all be so lucky as to know a Dr. She has friends at the community centre she attends, each with their own challenges, some of whom she understands will never be as independent as she is, but no matter.

She loves them anyway, so how could we not also? Great characters, great story, a firm favourite! Thanks to Scout Press, Simon and Schuster, for the print copy for review.

View all 25 comments. Zelda is a young woman born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, who functions well in a scripted routine.

She views everything in black and white, is crazy about Vikings and uses simplistic language with "words of the day" thrown in. Initially the novel felt derivative Curious Incident and YA except for the sex-talk.

I stuck with it because I thought the contradictions around her burgeoning sexuality and desire for independence were interestin [3.

I stuck with it because I thought the contradictions around her burgeoning sexuality and desire for independence were interesting - as well as her relationship with her brother.

The novel became more compelling and less predictable as it continued - and in the end I liked it! View all 8 comments. Jan 02, Carolyn rated it it was amazing Shelves: netgalley , , relationships , debut , netgalley , disability , quirky.

This is a very engaging debut novel featuring a young adult with a cognitive disability. Born with fetal alcohol syndrome, Zelda is high functioning but is quite guileless and naive, not always understanding social interactions and people's intentions, which can get her into dangerous situations.

Her parents both died when she was young and she and her brother Gert were sent to live with their creepy Uncle Richard, who was cruel to Gert and liked to touch Zelda.

After a knee injury put paid to t This is a very engaging debut novel featuring a young adult with a cognitive disability. After a knee injury put paid to the possibility of a college football scholarship, Gert dropped out of school, got a job at a gas station and moved himself and Zelda into a cheap apartment to get them away from Uncle Richard.

Gert does his best to look after Zelda, making sure she the structure she needs to her life and receives all the help she can get, but Gert's life is tough as he has his own emotional and financial problems and mixes with a rough group involved in drug dealing.

Zelda loves going to the library and is obsessed with Viking culture, reading everything about them that she can lay her hands on. Her favourite book is 'Kepple's Guide to the Vikings' and she frequently sends emails to the author asking for advice on how a Viking would behave in the situations she encounters.

She also decides that she wants to become a Viking Hero of her own legend, protecting her tribe Zelda's boyfriend Marxy, Gert and his girlfriend Anna and standing up for people who can't defend themselves.

Zelda is a unique character, easy to like as she fearlessly strives to do her best for her tribe. When she comes across people who are cruel or nasty she will boldly call them out, using the swear words she has grown up hearing.

Things also don't always go her way as she is often unable to take into account how others will react, but she is able to learn from situations that go badly.

When she decides it's time to have sex with her boyfriend Marxy also cognitively impaired , she tackles the issue head-on, unashamedly seeking advice and instruction from Gert's girlfriend but the results are both humorous and sad.

She is also easily deceived into being too trusting of others, leading to a major disaster for Gert and Anna. However, despite all this it's a delight to see Zelda experience a lot of personal growth as she gains enough confidence and independence to take more control of her own life.

This quirky debut novel gave a lot of food for food, especially on how disabled people should not be labelled, but treated as individuals, all capable of personal growth with the right opportunities and encouragement.

View 1 comment. Nov 12, Susan's Reviews rated it it was amazing Shelves: netgalley-arc. That ending was just beautiful. I'm still leaking tears as I write this review.

At the end of this epic tale, this talented author did not leave any loose ends untied: we certainly have a lot to learn from Viking lore.

For [Zelda] the world is a place where courage and being part of a tribe means more than anything else—where we are all Vikings paddling together, to the beat of the same drum.

Their biker father died in prison. Their mother died shortly after, leaving them to the mercy of their abusive Uncle Richard.

But, somehow, both Zelda and Gert were going to defy the odds and escape the stereotypical outcome for two young people who were caught in the vice of poverty and abuse - or would they?!

Gert is encouraged by one of his girlfriends to apply for a hardship scholarship to the state college.

He was awarded a scholarship, due mostly to the moving essay he submitted - which he won't let Zelda read - and life improves for the better for this hapless pair.

But Gert's alcohol and drug addictions, and his self-defeating attitude to life cause him to mess up time and again, threatening their fragile world.

During Zelda's perilous - and often horrifying - quest, I was spellbound as Zelda learned to become more self-reliant and confident in her abilities: she made me see ability, not disability.

You might well be thinking that this tale is all "Forrest Gump gets inducted to the Sons of Anarchy biker gang" - and for a while there I thought that this was exactly where we were headed.

But I am pleased to report that this story has so many levels to it, very few of which could be labeled predictable.

These characters were real and precious to me. I wanted to cover brave, tiny Zelda in a suit of armour. Her trust is continually abused, she suffers a major crisis of faith and the reality of stark, ugly death almost destroys her completely.

What a legendary journey, indeed! I rate this a 10 out of 5 star read: I could barely catch my breath when I finished the last sentence.

This truly impressive novel should be read by everyone. My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review View all 9 comments.

I absolutely adored this literary fiction about our protagonist Zelda who was born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, due to her mother's heavy drinking.

Zelda and her brother Gert are left on their own as their father died while in prison and their mother died shortly after.

I adored her character and how she is set in living with just some basic rules I found to be endearing and adorable.

I would love to be her friend. She is loyal, loving and protective of her tribe! Though Gert is the older brother and the one responsible for Zelda, I loved how she ends up responsible in saving him too.

Zelda has a unique narrative voice I enjoyed reading about. The story brought out all kinds of emotions but mostly laughing and crying with them.

This is truly an amazing heart warming story about these two people learning to lean on each other as siblings to traverse their difficulties in their lives.

The ending was beautiful and brought tears to my eyes. MacDonald wrote with such heart and creativity. This is certainly a must read and wonderful coming of age story as well.

I have never read anything like this and love the originality and creativity of the writing. I highly recommend this amazingly brilliant book.

View all 5 comments. Their mother died shortly after, leaving Zelda and her brother Gert at the mercy of their abusive Uncle Richard.

But , somehow, both Zelda and Gert defy the odds and escape the stereotypical outcome for two young people who were caught in the vice of poverty and abuse.

He is awarded the scholarship, due mostly to the moving essay he submitted - which he won't let Zelda read - and life improves for the better for this hapless pair.

During Zelda's perilous - and often horrifying - quest, I was spellbound as Zelda learned to become more self-reliant and confident in her abilities.

View all 4 comments. This one's really touching. And cartoonish. And endearing. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is shown rather inaccurately! After all, these things come as various blips on a really large spectrum.

Actually both siblings were pictured with some FAS characteristics. Zelda and her sex and her legendary stuff and the Dr. Kepple letters - ughhh!!!

Ocerall, I'd say I got a This one's really touching. Ocerall, I'd say I got a very interesting plot that includes a cognitively challenged person.

What more could I ask for? This wasn't a high-functioning level of disability, I'd say Was this something with maybe touches of some other issues?

Anyway, more's the power to Zelda being a memorable character. Gert pointed at me and made a sound with his throat.

He was standing in his shiny gold underwear, making animals out of balloons. He said that his specialty was dogs. Eleven minutes had passed by.

My appointment with Dr. Laird was always at 12 p. We had exactly one hour and nineteen minutes to get there. Since I did not know where we were, I could not do my problem-solving and minus the time it would take to drive from where we were to Dr.

A nice one. Q: But since I am an expert, I noticed many incorrect things. His blond hair was not really blond.

I could see that it had actually been colored. You are born one. Not like heroes, who become heroes by being legendary.

Deeds and actions are what will make a person great and legendary. I make up stories about her and tell them to everyone.

Vikings believe that telling stories here, on earth, will make a person in Valhalla very happy, and the best way to make someone happy is to make them into a legend that everyone talks about.

But first I would need to have a legend. I did not want to be a fair maiden who needed to be saved. I wanted to be the hero doing the saving.

Then I realized that I could win the love of a maiden who was not a woman but a man. But regular monsters are more complicated.

Why did they act like they were in the wrong store? We have other patients who need rest. Just my breathing in the dark, and outside a bright moon hanging in the sky.

I knew that she had to be a fuck-dick in the interview because you have to prove yourself worthy of being a librarian. You cannot just be a librarian without overcoming obstacles.

View 2 comments. Zelda is twenty-one years old and was born with fetal alcohol syndrome. She is high functioning with her learning disability and relies on repetition to learn her tasks.

She lives a simple life and maintains a constant routine to reduce anxiety. Zelda is friendly and attends community classes where she learns life skills such as basic finance and social interaction.

She is also obsessed with Vikings and uses their rituals as guidance in her life. Zelda lives with her older brother, Gert, who has Zelda is twenty-one years old and was born with fetal alcohol syndrome.

Zelda lives with her older brother, Gert, who has been responsible for them since their mother died. He has been attending a local college on a scholarship and their finances are stretched.

To make extra money, Gert becomes involved with a group of dangerous individuals. It is a book about family, love, and issues surrounding families with disabilities.

The book, narrated in the voice of Zelda, projects with honesty and strength. This is a hard hitting contemporary fiction book that has some mental health.

The main character in the book is Zelda, and she is a high functioning young adult diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome at born. She loves Vikings and rules.

I cannot say if the fetal alcohol syndrome is correct because I personal do not know anyone with fetal alcohol syndrome.

I can say I hate that her brother who is in charge of taking of her brings trouble into her live. I am a big problem of special needs world ar This is a hard hitting contemporary fiction book that has some mental health.

I am a big problem of special needs world around my area and things like this happens way to much. I love that she over comes the trouble Gert her brother brought into her world.

This book was so great, and it shows us about overcoming so much. Jan 02, Book of the Month added it. Why I love it by Bryn Greenwood As a reader, I'm always looking for the same things that attract me as a writer.

I love stories that are outside the mainstream, about people who, in other books, might be relegated to sidekicks or one-dimensional sources of inspiration.

When We Were Vikings hit that sweet spot for me. Zelda is an older teenager on the fetal alcohol spectrum, but she is nobody's disability inspiration.

She sees herself as a modern-day Viking with a sacred duty to protect her family, Why I love it by Bryn Greenwood As a reader, I'm always looking for the same things that attract me as a writer.

She sees herself as a modern-day Viking with a sacred duty to protect her family, even though her sword is a letter opener, and her family is basically just herself and an older brother with a messy past and a messier present.

As part of her plan to become a Viking legend, she's starting her first real job, and trying to go all the way with her boyfriend Marxy.

Because of her disability, there are those who want to control her, but she has her own ideas about how to live her life.

Not all of those ideas work out, but that doesn't stop Zelda from striving for independence. She may not be a great warrior, but Zelda's real strength is loving people.

And that—even when it's hard, even when people let you down or break your heart—that's legendary. Five stars all the way!

Audiobook narrated by the fabulous Phoebe Strole. Feb 03, Carrie rated it it was amazing Shelves: netgalley.

I have to say I thought Andrew David MacDonald did a wonderful job bringing day to day life alive for a character with cognitive differences.

I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. Zelda is a Viking enthusiast who is trying to make her way in a world full of villains whilst figuring out what makes someone a hero.

Born on the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum, she thinks and acts differently, but is still relatively high-functioning. It would be easy to make her FAS the main adversary in the story, or perhaps vilify her mother for drinking while pregnant.

But Zelda is the way she is, her mother is gone and even if you found a place to set that blame, where would that leave her? Andrew David MacDonald asks the reader to think and feel like Zelda, not to feel bad for her and get angry on her behalf.

Yes, she is different. It could make some uncomfortable to consider the circumstances of people who have to live differently.

The characters are not faultless and they have to make difficult choices. Jan 16, Susan Johnson rated it it was amazing.

I needed a book like this desperately. First of all, it has a main character, Zelda, you can unreservedly root for and she has surrounded herself with a tribe that gives her needed help, support, and love.

The point of this film was not about the fight itself or George Forman, yes he played a role as some have argued it should have.

It was about the symbolism that this fight possessed, especially revolving around Muhammad Ali' and the causes he fought for.

The definition of "greatest athlete" is ambiguous, but in my mind Ali, through this film and my recent is truly, "The greatest" as he so claimed.

The film did an excellent job of getting as much footage as possible of all that occurred during the preparation that led to the fight and how it symbolized the joining of black people in America and Africa for a common cause in defeating their oppressors US - white supremacy, and in Africa - European Colonialism.

These artists represent a significant part of black American culture, and knowing how important it probably was to all of those black Americans to go to Africa to spite the white American culture which wanted the fight there , which they felt used them, was something that was revolutionary.

Before seeing this film I knew little about the "Rumble in the Jungle," and little about Ali, but after seeing this film, I have come to realize that he really was "the greatest.

Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote. It goes nearly without saying that Ali is a transcendent figure of his generation.

For those currently in their twenties who did not grow up in Ali era, this film is a glimpse at why the world choked up upon seeing Ali light the flame at the Atlanta Olympiad.

While Gast's footage of Ali in Kinshasa is sparse, interview segments with Plimpton, Mailer and Lee, and a pulsing soundtrack fill in the blanks to tell a surprisingly complete tale.

The characters are fascinating: A young Don King, who had not yet made his name; a sullen, menacing George Foreman bearing no resemblance to the huckster we see today; the creepy Mobutu, who is rarely seen though his presence is felt, and Howard Cosell, who appears briefly to predict the defeat of the man who practically created him.

While Mann's film provides much more for the eye, Gast's "Kings" is a superior example of pure storytelling. This film won a slew of critical praise as well as quite a few awards and it deserves all of them.

Muhammad Ali is the most amazing athelete of the twentieth century and perhaps the most beloved boxer of all time.

A public poll once showed that people all over the world recognized him more then the President of the United States. Maybe its because he is such an ill, tragic figure today that this film is so important because it shows him in all his glory when he was not just a magnificent boxer but a ringing voice of social conscience as well.

This film shows him again in all his glory when he took on the seemingly invincible giant George Foreman.

George is such a beloved figure now that people have forgotten that when he first won the Heavywieght Crown from Joe Frazier in , that he was as dreaded and feared as Sonny Liston was in his heyday.

Howard Cosell was one of Ali's most ardent supporters he was one of the first to call him by that name and support him in his opposition of the draft and yet even Cosell said that he didn't think that Ali could beat George Foreman.

Ali had lost to Joe Frazier and Ken Norton and had barely won rematches with them, and Foreman knocked both of them silly in less then two rounds.

Ali was almost 33 years old and considered all washed up and yet he showed no fear against this man. He told the public "You think you were shocked when Nixon resigned, wait till I whip George Foreman's behind!!!

Don King is a despicable character and yet he was a genius in promoting this fight in Africa. He said it was like from slaveship to championship.

The symbolism was just tremendous. Norman Mailer and the late George Plimpton are two of the writers who most observed Ali and they both offer wonderful insights during the course of this film.

They are especially good when they talk about the fight itself and how they both had a ringside seat. George Plimpton saw Bobby Kennedy shot and yet I don't think he was much more astounded when he saw what happened in that ring when Ali pulled off an amazing upset and knocked out Foreman to begin another glorious championship rein.

It is almost comical when they show their shocked faces as Ali delivered the knockout blow. The best part of the film is where they play the song "When We Were Kings" at the end and show a montage of Ali's fights during his amazing career.

You will look at these and realize how awesome this man truly was!!! I recall attending a closed circuit telecast of the Ali-Foreman fight in Miami in , and when "The Greatest" actually pulled it off - regaining HIS title after the enforced exile - most of the audience went nuts.

Rarely have I been in an environment of such absolute joy. This first class documentary leaves me wishing I had been in Zaire to experience that emotion "live".

This is terrific film making about one of the most complicated and extraordinary heroes of the twentieth century and is richly deserving of the Academy Award which it received.

Stu 2 March This is not a film without flaws. At certain points, I cringe at some of the implications, at the juxtaposition of images and thoughts.

If this film were on a different topic, I would probably dislike it. That withstanding, it is a film about something so rare and exquisite, so moving, so profound: a hero.

Muhammad Ali is the only man I can think of in the 20th Century deserving of this title. Just to look at him is to feel awe. His beauty, his conviction, his strength, his piety, all bound together in a contradictory but exquisite whole.

Ali is a Whittman poem of flesh and blood. Shortcomings of this film aside, I can watch it again and again, and cry every time.

And feel both shame and strength, and perhaps some hope, when confronted with Ali. If I ever have children, they will watch this film, if only because I can find nothing else that I can say stands for what I believe in.

Sylviastel 1 May The fight was nicknamed the rumble in the jungle. The documentary follows Ali and Foreman. Ali is the underdog in the ring against Foreman on October 30, The outcome is remarkable as is the story behind both fighters.

Ali is proud of being an African American, honest, opinionated, and vocal about civil rights in America and in Africa.

He was proud to see Africans who flew, lived, and governed their own country. Sadly, Ali isn't well with Parkinsons. The disease has crippled his voice but not his message in recent years.

The documentary is historical for so many reasons. To anyone born after Muhammad Ali's heyday as a boxer, it would be difficult to describe the impact he had on American life and culture.

Sure, one can read about it and watch other documentaries, but there's something to be said about experiencing it in real time with Ali's name in the headlines, proclaiming himself to be The Greatest both in and out of the ring.

The picture does a credible job of presenting the behind the scenes machinations to bring the 'Rumble in the Jungle' to fruition, even with a six week delay due to a training injury suffered by Foreman.

Thinking back to those days, I had never considered the implications of making the fight a black political statement, though in hindsight I would question allowing the involvement of a dictator like Mobutu Sese Seko putting up the money for the event.

As described by Norman Mailer, one of the writers interviewed for the film, Mobutu was a closet sadist who rounded up a thousand criminals and put them in detention pens underneath the fight stadium to remove the threat of criminal activity while the eyes of the world were on his country.

Don't expect to see a lot of the eight round fight in this documentary. What you need to know is capably explained by Mailer and fellow sportswriter George Plimpton laying out Ali's strategy and how he approached the fight.

Mailer's analysis in particular is helpful in detailing how Ali's right hand leads so enraged Foreman that he used up a lot of his power and energy in trying to destroy him.

Quite honestly though, I don't know quite what to make of the 'succubus' story that Plimpton seemed to be so fascinated with.

Perhaps the most significant take away I had from the picture was hearing Spike Lee's comments that had nothing to do with the fight.

He was speaking of black youth, but I would ascribe his remarks to all colors of a young generation today that remain completely unaware of history, and even worse, are disinterested in learning about it.

Most certainly, Muhammad Ali would have something to say about that. ElMaruecan82 13 June Cynically, I assumed that had Ali lost, the documentary wouldn't have been made, but then I remembered that it waited 22 years to be made, and receive the Academy Award for Best Documentary in In other words, it wasn't supposed to 'make a film'; it was a legend from the very start.

And "Rumble in the Jungle" is the nostalgic celebration of the most legendary episode of Boxing History, through a recollection of images and stories from those who witnessed the event.

It's a treasure in terms of archive footage, musical sequences, and extraordinary shots of Ali haranguing his African fans and shining everyone with his unique charisma or Don King discussing the black condition with James Brown.

The match is almost secondary while the film is more of a magnificent tribute to the enormous contribution of African American people in sport and entertainment.

Some would think that the genius of people is better measured on fields such as science, medicine, physics, literature or politics, but in these times, sport and music was the most likely medium where African American people could express their voice.

And sport is probably the noblest expression of Humanity's true spirit: self-accomplishment, victory and respect.

While science and literature cruelly depend on the level of education one has received, sport is universal; it's no-money learning: anyone can develop physical abilities with his own will.

In a world full of segregation, sport offers the less segregationist environment. While intelligence can be used to disguise ignorance, strength cannot disguise weakness, the strongest is the strongest.

Boxing is probably the most straight-forward incarnation of the true essence of sport, and on that discipline, Muhammad Ali was the greatest, a sort of semi-God like figure who had to prove his physical strength, before it transcended the limits of the ring, even at the risk of becoming an unpopular figure, an outcast but sometimes, it's this very status that paves the way to the legend.

One has to remember how truly unpopular Ali became when he refused to fight in Vietnam. As recalls Spike Lee, interviewed in the documentary, it's not just the refusal but the way it was stated: "No Vietcong ever called me a N-word".

Ali shouted what every member of his community was secretly thinking, he had the guts to refuse to be a government's puppet, he lost his Heavyweight Champion title and couldn't fight for several years, but what it cost him in sports, elevated him above all the other athletes: more than a spokesperson, he became a living icon, a myth and a model.

Basically, his refusal taught people one thing: that one can't ask for respect if he doesn't respect himself. And the man who 'shook up the world' by defeating Sonny Liston had too much self-esteem to fight against people he's got nothing against just because he's told to do so.

Respect starts with self-respect and even school can't teach you to respect yourself. This is why the documentary might be guilty of a certain bias toward Ali, but it doesn't denigrate Foreman either.

He is the 'quiet yet invulnerable' force, a Fighting Machine that knocked out and dethroned Joe Frazier after a technical knock-out, but his lack of flamboyance and eccentricity allowed Ali to conquer the hearts of all the Zairian people.

Basically, "Rumble in the Jungle" could have been subtitled the "Ali show". The film isn't pro-Ali or anti-Foreman, it even manages to draw a sort of retrospectively sympathetic portrait of 'Big George' who just couldn't outsize Ali, popularity-wise.

An unfortunate irony is that even as a darker person, Foreman incarnated the 'White man' for the people, by arriving at the airport with a blonde shepherd, symbol of the previous Belgian colon.

Misunderstood, Foreman also misunderstood the public, and the whole fight's symbolism, he showed as an African American man, while Ali was exalting the pride of the difference, this pride that started when he refused to assign.

And this is exactly this pride of the difference that the film conveys through Ali's exuberant personality, even the title works like a slogan reminding that there was a time where Africa was the mother of humanity, when there was a pride to be Black, and people like Ali revived that pride.

The film powerfully encapsulates the spirit within the black people in America or Africa, this 'Booma ye! Difference, not assimilation and never had the Black pride been as authentic, as sincere, as expressed by Muhammad Ali, an equal of Nelson Mandela, Malcolm X and ironically to Patrice Lumumba who was ordered to be killed by the very President of Zaire, Mobutu himself.

Nothing positive can be dictated by terror and beyond the whole show, orchestrated by Don King, Ali and Foreman were not there to express an antagonism, but to play a game, it was a performance.

And the film, although trying sometimes to convey a false sense of suspense by depicting Ali as a challenger who had almost no chance to win -a theory contradicted by most boxing experts- the legend preceded the match.

How about the victory then? Well, I guess my "what if" questions were unthinkable in Ali's mind. It's as if, as a Muslim, he believed that some things were like written by God or Allah himself wanted to make reality even more appealing as fiction.

Indeed, while "When We Were Kings" is a documentary and a damn good one, I felt it as emotionally gripping as a fiction.

First I must say that the editing is some of the best I have seen. WOW is the right world for this film.

Muhammad Ali is really a genius and I think you will understand that when you see this film. The film is also very good because of people like Spike Lee,Malick Bowens and George Plimpton tells fascinating observations about the time.

B King,James Brown and the Spinners. I watched this movie last night on CBC, my third viewing. It keeps getting better.

As fascinating a story as one would ever hope to see in any movie. In case anyone does not know why Muhammed Ali was widely named as the athlete of the century by many in This film will explain.

Ironically, the long delay in finishing and releasing this film may have improved the finished product.

The increased perspective of more than a decade may have sharpened the editing choices. Not a method I would recommend as it is rather hard on the artist, but we benefit in this case.

It is important to recognize that whatever this film started out as, it became a study of Ali. And what a subject for study. What an athlete, what a man.

Wilson 2 February To focus only on Ali like or dislike , or just the significance of the boxing match alone, would be missing the point of this movie.

Tell your friends that it's not just a sports movie! It is a Documentary that focuses not only on the fight, but on the black culture in the U.

That's culture as defined by its people, music, athletes, politics, business and other innumerable parts, as observed by several different people, inside and outside.

The insights offered by George Plimpton and Norman Mailer are priceless. It's history and entertainment together, and thoroughly enjoyable to watch.

It would be simplistic and unjust to reject the Documentary because of personal prejudices or disagreement with Ali's politics.

It is also a mistake to isolate and criticize colourful comments, chants and poetry! Not only was Ali a great boxer and a great entertainer, he is an intelligent and articulate man.

He uses his high profile to deliver messages of racial pride, heritage, hope and peace. The fact that Parkinson's Disease has physically afflicted and almost silenced this man is a tragedy.

We have been deprived of hearing what the 26 years of life experience since may have done to Ali's outlook and beliefs. Writing this has inspired me to go to the library; maybe he hasn't been silenced totally, and someone is talking for him.

Like this film, it's a subject worth investigating! This is the Oscar winning documentary about the legendary boxing bout between Muhammad Ali, the challenger and George Foreman, who was the reigning world heavy weight boxing champion of the time.

The match became popular as "Rumble in the Jungle". Both the fighters were blacks. However, Ali was revered as a demi-God because he had spoken about the atrocities which the African Americans were facing in the US and had refused to go and fight in Vietnam.

He was considered a true representative of the blacks. George Foreman, as the documentary says, was "blacker than Ali".

But still he was taken as the white devil incarnate. The match was promoted by Don King. The movie is very gripping and shows the human face of the Gods of the Gloves.

Two thumbs up. This film should be made mandatory watching for all school children. Historically it covers the greatest sporting event of all time and at the same time chronicles the amazing man himself.

The Champ is not just articulate and charismatic He was a poor mans champion I wasn't alive at the time, but the film portrays brilliantly what an underdog Ali was and how everyone half expected Foreman to kill him.

Then it shows how Ali very cleverly outwitted his opponent. Psychologically Ali was a heavyweight and Foreman a lightweight.

With heart and determination he overcame the colossus that was Foreman. Watching Foreman in this documentary and his awesome power I don't believe any boxer since has had the punching power of this man.

For god sake he came back at 45 and won the title! Imagine what he was like at The Rumble in the Jungle destroyed Foreman The world must have shaken that night.

Leon Gast. Eigentlich war es nur ein Boxkampf, der da ausgetragen wurde. Das Spiel gegen Roter Stern Belgrad am Breaking the waves mit Go here. Ricken, Lupfen jetzt! Die sechsteilige ORF-Doku Bruderkrieg von ist zwar keine Sportreportage, gibt aber dennoch Erkenntnisse, warum Sportereignisse zwischen Teams aus den jeweiligen Ländern noch heute von einer besonderen Spannung geprägt sind.

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