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A scanner darkly

A Scanner Darkly Filme wie A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm

In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der Ermittler Fred ist wie so viele andere auch der Droge `Substance D' verfallen, die bei Konsumenten zu gespaltenen Persönlichkeiten führt. So entsteht neben Fred der Drogendealer. A Scanner Darkly – Der dunkle Schirm ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction​-Film von Richard Linklater aus dem Jahr Die Handlung beruht auf dem. Der dunkle Schirm (engl. A Scanner Darkly) ist ein Science-Fiction-Roman von Philip K. Dick aus dem Jahr Hauptthema des in Teilen autobiografischen. jonkoping-filmfestival.se - Kaufen Sie A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und. A Scanner Darkly -der dunkle Schirm. (18)1h 40min Als der verdeckte Ermittler Fred den Auftrag erhält, sein eigene s Haus und damit sich selbst zu.

a scanner darkly

Inhalt:»A Scanner Darkly«ist kein gewöhnlicher Comic, sondern die graphische Umsetzung eines Films, den der amerikanische Regisseur Richard Linklater. Komplette Handlung und Informationen zu A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm​. In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der. jonkoping-filmfestival.se - Kaufen Sie A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und.

A Scanner Darkly Video

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A Scanner Darkly Video

A Scanner Darkly - Original Theatrical Trailer Then he is able to sit click here a police facility and observe his housemates through "holo-scanners", audio-visual surveillance devices that are placed throughout the house. Release Dates. Die rebellin group of suburban teenagers try to support each other through the difficult task of becoming adults. Dick, his most personal work, examining drug abuse and the way society treats drug addicts, 'A Scanner Darkly' tells the story site avp 2 consider undercover cop Keanu Reeves, hold on hasn't he done this beforeas he infiltrates a 'substance D' group, a new drug everyone is addicted to. Boy, is batman gotham. The film read more beautiful to look at, rotoscoped with heavy black lines surrounding click to see more blocks of colour, but can you draw any a scanner darkly about the content from the style? Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Retrieved April 29, Today, I think if both sides of your family have addictions, for your own sake, don't drink or use drugs. A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm ein Film von Richard Linklater mit Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder. Inhaltsangabe: Drogenfahnder Fred (Keanu Reeves). Linklaters A Scanner Darkly basiert auf einer Kurzgeschichte von Philip K. Dick und zeichnet ein düsteres Bild einer von Drogen zerfressenen Gesellschaft. Inhalt:»A Scanner Darkly«ist kein gewöhnlicher Comic, sondern die graphische Umsetzung eines Films, den der amerikanische Regisseur Richard Linklater. Komplette Handlung und Informationen zu A Scanner Darkly - Der dunkle Schirm​. In der Zukunft hat Amerika den Krieg gegen die Drogen verloren. Der. Turk Pipkin. Jetzt auf Amazon Video und 2 weiteren Anbietern anschauen. Begeistert erst durch seinen Stil, mischt useful kinox shameless german that etwas zu krass verschiedene Genres zusammen, überrascht dann wieder mit tollen Einfällen, wirkt irgendwann article source durch seinen Stil etwas zu distanziert, kann sich aber am Ende doch link durch seine Story retten. Deine Click the following article. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. a scanner darkly He also reveals something extremely personal to his readers: he is not in the novel, he is the novel. Friend Reviews. Powell Here are learn more here of my favourite examples of what the writing is like in this book: Bull serie 2, he thought, is knowing you got some pills. Good night and good luck about right. Hey, wait a toker minute. Plot Summary.

It stems from the period following his revelatory religious experiences in The cult science fiction author spent the last decade of his life trying to understand a series of visions he experienced under the effects of sodium pentothal after a dental operation, a struggle charted in his biblical Exegesis and in the novels Radio Free Albemuth, Valis and The Divine Invasion.

It's this phase of Dick's life that, more than any other, cemented his reputation as a modern-day mystic. But in Dick's own reflections on those years, it's clear he experienced a protracted mental breakdown or a series of psychological disorders brought on by drug abuse.

The value of his later writing is not as mystical insight, but a social document concerning an all-too-common modern affliction.

Bob Arctor's life is really Dick's life over a two-year period, from , after his fourth wife Nancy left him.

It was a restless life, sliding through relationships and jobs, and from city to city. Finding himself alone again, Dick filled his four-bedroom house with drifters and fell fully into drug addiction.

A Scanner Darkly was born from this period and is a fascinating portrait of 70s Californian counter-culture. Arctor falls further than his creator.

His dual life as an investigator and addict in thrall to the mysterious narcotic Substance D, lead him to a crisis.

He ends up a low-functioning schizophrenic, embroiled in a plot to infiltrate the manufacturing cycle of Substance D. The darkness here is not in the high-concept sci fi or conspiracy theories that permeate much of Dick's fiction, but in the credible depiction of a life collapsing under the weight of a mental breakdown.

Arctor slowly loses family and friends, work and livelihood. He falls between the cracks of society and becomes one of the broken, exploited and weak at the bottom of the heap.

The theme of darkness runs through literature as a metaphor for our fears. As a society, we are so scared of insanity that we construct all kinds of guises to hide it from view: the lunatic, the criminal, the addict.

And with these illusions in place we pretend lunacy, crime and addiction aren't right there waiting for us should misfortune find us.

A Scanner Darkly is about the fragility of our lives and the obscure horror of insanity. That's what it's like to be a chick.

I'm suing one guy in court right now, for molestation and assault. We're asking punitive damages in excess of forty thousand. In some ways the patina of science-fiction means it does a better job of explaining it all than any of them.

And as the title warns you, it's not an upbeat tale. It spirals into a dark place, and then leaves you there. In a heartbreaking Afterword, Dick lists the friends he knew at that time and records the damage that was done to them.

One of the names is his own. We really all were very happy for a while, sitting around not toiling but just bullshitting and playing, but it was for such a terribly brief time, and then the punishment was beyond belief; even when we could see it, we could not believe it.

They remain in my mind, and the enemy will never be forgiven. It's like all his gifts and obsessions finally had something real through which to be refracted — and the results may be dark, but they're also brilliant.

View all 39 comments. Aug 28, Darwin8u rated it it was amazing Shelves: american , , scifi , aere-perennius , fiction.

Be happy NOW , for tomorrow I will be writing. Let US all be happy. Four or five paragraphs. I liked it a lot. So, I was rather disheartened when my computer froze and I had to do a hard-boot to unfreeze it.

Lost everything but the vague outlines of what I wrote. Even those vague outlines seem difficult to grasp right now.

I'm kinda demoralized. But right now I just don't care. I'm still pissed about the loss and have a hard time seeing through the glass at all.

This list is basically unending. It seems like all novels about drug abuse, alcohol addiction, etc..

They surf those disjointed, dream-like spaces -- seducing man from the first time he got buzzed from eating, drinking, or smoking something deliriant.

These dope trips aren't rational, they aren't lucid, etc. It is impossible to read a novel about addiction without recognizing the author's fingerprints all over it.

These novels are all memoirs of sorts. Their pages hold more truth than the Library of Congress. They are funky road trips through hell and PKD is the perfect acid artist for this vicious trip.

These weren't scenes created ex nihilo. These pages all resonate like some haunted Totentanz. They chill like a Vanitas dream you can't quite escape.

I can't remember what I wrote. The words, the melody, even the beat of what was once alive is now dead View all 7 comments. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Who am I? Dick I'm a big Pynchon fan, too, so don't get me wrong here, but it seems to me like the main difference between Dick's writing style and Pynchon's--or at least, the difference that mostly accounts for Dick being treated as a "pulp" author with some interesting ideas whereas Pynchon is considered a major "literary" figure--is simply that Dick tends to write in crisp, straightforward sentences If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Dick I'm a big Pynchon fan, too, so don't get me wrong here, but it seems to me like the main difference between Dick's writing style and Pynchon's--or at least, the difference that mostly accounts for Dick being treated as a "pulp" author with some interesting ideas whereas Pynchon is considered a major "literary" figure--is simply that Dick tends to write in crisp, straightforward sentences that just directly say what he means to say, whereas Pynchon's writing is in famously dense with allusion and rambling esoteric figurative expressions to the point where it can be an intellectual exercise in its own right just trying to figure out what the hell Pynchon is trying to say.

I think Dick was really gifted as a wry satirist, too, and this is something I think he's often under-appreciated for.

In short, I don't think Dick was ever bad at writing--he just doesn't seem to have had any real interest in the kind of writing that people like James Joyce or William Burroughs or Pynchon, for whom to my mind it seems that both Joyce and Burroughs were major stylistic influences were famous for.

If you're into SF, read on. View all 4 comments. Mar 25, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: mindfuq , sci-fi , shelf , reality-bending.

How much fun I have with the bugs. Or how much fun I have with the missing gears on the bike.

Or how much fun I have with Bob, Fred, or whoever the hell the main character is. Freaky cool. I think, more than anything, I love the philosophy that is snuck in at random moments or explored in long stretches without a direct reference.

PKD's afterward is very nice and also very sad, but the core idea is not lost. We were all just kids not wanting to grow up, but the punishment was entirely out of scope with that crime.

This is, ostensibly, a novel about drugs, but it is also something much deeper. It is a novel about ennui, confusion, paranoia, and the senseless horror of living a world that cannot know what it wants, or if it does, refuses to give an inch when it comes to forgiving itself.

You might say it is a hell of our own creation. Not really. Kinda obvious. But so obvious that we continually forget the fact and get caught up in our continual confusion until we utterly forget it.

And then, when we have someone pipe up with the pithy observation that we're living in a hell of our own creation, we laugh and get a hammer and kill the poor fool or get him hooked on drugs or send him to a mental institution or we follow him around like some guru and shave our heads and no one pays him any mind anyway.

Hello, Phil! You lived in abject poverty all your life Sounds about right. Welcome to the Empire. It never ended.

Original Review: This is my second time reading this wonderful novel, and I see no reason to revise any of my initial impressions. It's still very enjoyable Maybe I have a soft spot in my heart for all those wonderful novels that either deal with the nature of reality, of conscious identity, of drug use, or just plain consequences of one's actions.

Fortunately for me, I've got so many of my favorite themes in one novel. To me, it builds on the success of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and only mildly resonates with any overt SF gadgethood.

Instead, it speculates wildly about the people who use and the people who suffer, showing us all how much worse the punishment is for what is, in effect, a victimless crime.

A discussion about Pot? If so, it is rather early in the turning of the wheel. We're shown people having fun despite the darkness of their lives and despite the heavy consequences, whether by huge mental instability, outright madness, incarceration, brainwashing, and last but not least, inequity of justice.

Maybe the last isn't as obvious until you read the author's afterward, or maybe it'll bash you over the head as you roam the fields.

Either way, Death is only an inversion of self, and the faster a person runs toward fulfilling themselves through drugs or hedonism, the faster they lose everything that matters in their lives.

PKD's dark universe and exploration of the mind falling apart, of draconian measures tearing harmless people apart, of the absolute irony of the end of the novel I happen to know a bit about PKD's life.

He wasn't the drug fiend that people made him out to be. He smoked some pot and dropped a few tabs of acid in his life, but he was also a man of his times.

He was more interested in philosophy and the nature of reality, religion, and the mind that most writers, but that's not to say he was anything other than paranoid.

He was. And that was the main feature of most of his great novels. Counterculture was his passion. So was questioning the fabric of reality.

Some of his last novels exemplify this. A later brain tumor cannot explain away the devotion to these threads of themes, although I think we can all agree that it did make him a bit obsessive about it.

Regardless, this was first and foremost a deliberate novel set out to deliberately show the blurred definitions between the norms and the abnorms, the crazies and the sane, the users and the clean.

Everything was merely a reversal in the glass. Narcs and pushers were practically the same, and the funniest bits of the book had to be either the antics of the friends or the deliciousness of having our MC ironically persecute himself every step of the way.

What a beautiful novel. Not my absolute favorite of his works, but it is crazy good. Now, off to re-watch the great Linklater film!

View all 8 comments. God, how dark it is here, and totally silent. Nothing but me lives in this vacuum… Philip K. The story follows the character of Bob and his friends, who are both using and selling a mind-bending drug called Substance D.

We also follow Fred, a cop who works for a form of drug bust squad. The hook is that Bob and Fr God, how dark it is here, and totally silent.

The hook is that Bob and Fred are the same person. Dick was a drug user himself. Because of this, he is able to paint a hauntingly realistic picture of the life of a drug user and the constant haze they live in.

Written in , it still holds up today and points must go to Dick for one of the best titles for a book, ever. Great opening The opening sequence had me hooked.

Dick also writes the tragic elements of the story very well. Here are some of my favourite examples of what the writing is like in this book: Happiness, he thought, is knowing you got some pills.

What did any man, doing any kind of work, know about his actual motives? To see that warm living person burn out from the inside, burn from the heart outward.

Until it clicked and clacked like an insect, repeating one sentence again and again. A recording.

A closed loop of tape. Notable issues The writing does ramble on in places. To me, I would have chopped some chunks out of this book to make it even shorter.

Final thought A great book with a dark, ominous atmosphere which rolls off the page and into your head.

Highly recommended. View all 5 comments. The one thing I have always told myself is I need to read a Philip K.

Dick story. I mean. You see, one of the side effects of Substance D is that it causes your mind to break from reality.

Bob is Bob when he is Bob, but thanks to Bob imbibing in some of his own wares he is also Fred trying to bust Bob when he is Fred.

Dick was a real soothsayer with regard to the future of drug use in America. Not interested in reading or listening to the book?

Good news! And an all-star supporting cast. Mar 26, J. Sutton rated it really liked it. We are exchanging too much passive life for the reality outside us.

There were a couple of times when I felt that A Scanner Darkly, a story about an undercover narc agent who narcs on himself before being sent to rehab, should have been one of PK Dick's short stories.

However, just when I thought PKD had played out his hand, the scene would change and we would return to one of Dick's central tenets in a new way: how do we know what is real.

That is followed by characters trying both to figure out We are exchanging too much passive life for the reality outside us.

That is followed by characters trying both to figure out their twisted reality and who they are or might be. PKD makes sure it's never an easy call.

A Scanner Darkly got better as it continued and kept pushing the boundaries of reality and identity.

Finally, the epilogue to A Scanner Darkly is more moving than I remember an epilogue ever being.

The weird and trippy s drug scene in California ala PKD Originally posted at Fantasy Literature If you were choosing any Hollywood actor to narrate an audiobook of PKD about dope users in Southern California in the early s, who would you choose?

I tried to distill the vibe of the book in the following passage I assembled on my own. Or even worse, you might get hooked on Substance D and your two brain hemispheres might split into Bob Arctor, doper extraordinaire, and Phil, undercover DEA agent.

Things get even more messed up when you do surveillance on…yourself. There are moments of hilarity mainly centered on two crazy housemates named Barris and Luckman, played brilliantly by Robert Downey Jr.

Bob Arctor is a minor drug dealer and user living in Anaheim with a few other dopers who spend their days trying to score dope, hash, mushrooms, and other chemical substances.

But unknown to them, Bob is also Fred, an undercover DEA agent assigned to spy on the house and track down the suppliers of Substance D.

The problem is, the drug also causes the two hemispheres of the brain to bifurcate until the user has two separate personalities that are unaware of each other.

His handlers discover his drug addiction and send him to the New Path rehab facility for drug addicts, but this is also loosely based on some real-life experiences of PKD.

Since this is so autobiographical, you might wonder why it needs to be SF. But I digress. And herein lies a problem. And while literature exposes readers to all kinds of unfamiliar worlds, this one can get fairly tedious at times.

The junkie mentality is perfectly depicted in its total fixation on getting the next fix at any cost, and there is no hesitation to steal, betray, or even stand by idly as your other junkie friends choke on a piece of food, die from overdoses, or go through painful withdrawals.

The movie version is directed by Richard Linklater, an indie filmmaker from Austin, Texas. Considering the mind-altered states of the characters in the film, it is the perfect visual medium to depict their slippery grasp of reality.

It makes each scene fresh and interesting to look at, and yet all the actors are unmistakably themselves.

Having read the book before watching the film, I felt like all of the best scenes of the book were picked up for the film while the some overlong stoned conversations ended up on the cutting room floor.

My favorite scenes in the book were done to perfection, like Freck getting pulled over, the discovery of the still-lit joint, the stolen mountain bike, the home-made silencer, and the clowning around of Luckman and Barris were brilliantly captured by Downey and Harrelson I wonder, did PKD write the parts just for them, seeing into the future?

The screenplay also by Richard Linklater also interspersed more hints of the New Path rehab clinic earlier in the film to make the final part of the film more cohesive than in the book.

And Keanu Reeves? Well, most people lambaste him for his wooden, emotionless delivery, but who better to play a conflicted, schizophrenic undercover cop and heavy drug user.

He is perfect in the role. I even think I detected the distinctive red stripe of a Costco superstore when they were driving along the highway.

Far out, dude. One day I figure out all of a Philip K. Dick novel. Ah, who am I kidding, lol. Truthfully, I like the challenge.

Love the ideas. The guy was brilliant. In an epilogue, he offers his reason for writing A Scanner Darkly. It is poignant to say the least.

He adds that there is no moral to 3. He adds that there is no moral to his story. With drugs, there are only consequences.

He tells this from personal experience. I am the novel. View all 15 comments. I've made it. I have finally reached the summit of the second Library of America collection of Philip K.

With my flag firmly planted atop the snow-capped peak of this book I can look back upon two weeks of paranoia, time travel, authoritarian governments and more experimental drugs than you can find outside of a Merck testing lab, with the self-satisfied air of a man who has plumbed the depths of speed-induced psychosis and made it through the other si I've made it.

With my flag firmly planted atop the snow-capped peak of this book I can look back upon two weeks of paranoia, time travel, authoritarian governments and more experimental drugs than you can find outside of a Merck testing lab, with the self-satisfied air of a man who has plumbed the depths of speed-induced psychosis and made it through the other side.

What better reward could I ask for, though, than to have finally allowed myself to read a book I knew I would love from the moment I saw the film, A Scanner Darkly?

I have wanted to read this book since the first time I heard of it, way back in the heady year of when I was working the front desk of a hostel in Prague and running a traveler's lending library of english-language literature.

I was fresh off of Man in the High Castle and was handed a tattered paperback by a Welshman along with the benediction that this book would "utterly melt your mind.

Unfortunately that copy was soon lost among the ever-changing residents of the hostel and an opportunity was postponed.

I've read nearly two dozen of Dick's books in the time since then but for one reason or another have never returned to A Scanner Darkly until now.

The wait has made it even more delectable. Bob Arctor is an undercover cop investigating the sale of a drug known as Substance D, a heavily addictive drug its users lovingly refer to as Death because the end result of long term use is always either the big D itself or a fugue state in which the user's basic motor functions and cognitive abilities are stripped away, leaving a husk of a person behind.

To infiltrate the organization making this drug, Arctor has become addicted to Substance D and is living in a bacchanal of a drug pad with 3 other users and attempting to make time with his dealer, Donna Hawthorne.

He reports back to his office under the pseudonym of "Fred" and wearing a scramble suit to anonymize his identity, because no one knows the extent to which the police department has been corrupted by the drug syndicate, which leads to his superiors deciding that the user Bob Arctor is worthy of deeper investigation as he seems to have access to larger amounts of money than a man of his background should have and many hours where he simply disappears without a trace of course, these are the times when Arctor is checking in with the department as Fred.

So Arctor begins investigating himself in a move so biting it could have been culled from one of Kafka's nightmares.

Sitting in a secret facility, reviewing hours and hours of surveillance tapes, and hearing all of the inane blather that only a house full of junkies can think is profound, Arctor's consciousness begins to fragment down the center until his cop persona Fred begins to suspect that Arctor is in business with some very shady people and becomes determined to bring him down.

It's always a relief to me when a book manages to live up to the expectations I have, especially when it's a read I've been looking forward to for a number of years.

The dialogue was spot on, so many of the conversations between Arctor and his roommates, Barris and Luckman, seem as though they could have easily been taken from real life.

Especially considering that at the time he was writing this, Dick had essentially opened up his home in Berkeley to the ever-shifting tide of drug users, political activists, and wanderers that were all moving through the Bay Area in the early 70s.

The paranoia that is a hallmark of every Dick work reaches its pinnacle here as Arctor races against his own failing mind to collar his crook in time, who just happens to be himself.

It is easily worthy of the praise which has been heaped upon it, and it was really nice to find proof that one of Dick's books had finally been adapted to film in a manner that did justice to the source material.

The only disappointment I feel is that I no longer have this book to look forward to, though I am certain that I will return for a reread at least once or twice in the years to come.

Thus ends my Dick binge of I've made it through a good number of the author's books by this point and the only major work still remaining are his Exegesis books VALIS , Radio Free Albemuth , and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer , which I will get to at some point down the road when my mind is on more firm ground than it is after devouring five reality-shifting books.

View 1 comment. Jun 28, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi , pres-sf. I think the later PKD novels tend to be more serious and introspective though the weirdness is always present.

A Scanner Darkly is one of his early 70s books and I find it more grounded than his earlier books, less insane and a little less fun to read.

It is also semi-autobiographical and more melancholy than his other books that I have read. The novel is mostly centered on Bob Arctor, an undercover narcotics officer who lives among three addicts in a rented house and has a girlfriend who is a small time pusher.

The trouble is Bob is too deep under cover and has become an addict himself, consuming copious amount of this drug which messes up his head to the extent that he begins to have an identity crisis and lose his capacity for clear thoughts.

This novel reads more like a thriller or drama about drug abuse than science fiction. There are even some hilarious moments in the book such as the bizarre story of a motorized man-shaped block of hash told by one of the junkies.

Dick is often criticized for writing inelegant prose, I never notice this myself as I have always liked his uncluttered prose, the right tool for the right job of telling his bizarre stories.

Flowery or lyrical narrative style seems to be very unsuitable for his material. That said A Scanner Darkly seems to be more well written than his books from the 60s; on the other hand there is much more swearing in this book than I can remember from his earlier books.

There is also a little bit of romance, considerable compassion, kindness, and sadness. I would recommend reading this novel then watch the faithful movie adaptation for maximum appreciation.

And now a mini-review of A Scanner Darkly, movie It is a good movie with a unique look and good performances by the actors.

However, I wish the filmmaker Richard Linklater has shot the movie conventionally instead of employing the "interpolated rotoscope" technology to make the movie look like animation.

On the plus side, the movie does look suitably surreal, like junkie's drug addled perspective. Unfortunately, the animated look puts an additional layer between the actors and the audience and causes an emotional disconnection.

View all 6 comments. What a great book. Nothing too heavy, not overly deep, but I could sense there was more to this author than that. This book has confirmed my suspicions and exceeded my expectations, and so Philip K.

Dick has managed to take me by surprise even when I was expecting to be surprised by this author at some point. Before reading this book, I had no idea what I wa What a great book.

Before reading this book, I had no idea what I was getting into. I thought this would be some dystopian novel, where drugs controls people and the drugs is controlled by the people who are supposed to be taking care of the people.

Brave New World kind of thing. But "A Scanner Darkly" is much more personal, and feels much more profound as a result. It's not describing the collapse of a society but the collapse of a mind.

Dick allowed me a tour in the minds of drug users in such a convincing way that if I would ever have had the desire to try hard drugs as an experiment, this book would have given me my fix.

He is a safari guide with scars of lion attacks on his back, an eye missing and a sad look in the one remaining. In essence, a guide who knows and feels what he's talking about.

And it shows. But despite the weight of this heavy topic, the author finds a balance between the gay and the sad, the asides and the profound, the thinking and the feeling, the despair and the hope.

This book is about drugs, this book is drugs. But only in the good way. I will need to return to this book or it's going to be very cold in Turkey.

A must-read for anyone, everyone, and those inbetween and outside of those two. It also made me spin my own little fantasy reel, as follows below I'm walking down a sunny street, with the hot summerheat beating down on me.

I'm being pushed and shoved down a street I don't want to be in to a place I don't want to go to, and I get angry looks.

The stares are icy cold but the sun keeps beating and heating me, burning me up. In the corner of my eye, I see my salvation.

A small alleyway, a neon-lit sign, "A Scanner Darkly", flash flash, illuminating the cool shadows. I'm going in, I think.

It's what I should do, I know. Under the sign there's an open door, so getting in is easy. All I need is a little taste for adventure and one more angry look down from main street.

Here I go. I'm in a long hallway. I hear laughter all around me, but there's nobody around, nobody I can see anyway, just voices of merriment.

The voices feel real, and generous and sincere. I go further, intrigued, looking for the source of all this joy.

The hallway is nice and cool, the beating sun is already half-forgotten. I keep walking, losing myself in a train of thought. I'm going left.

Straight ahead. Left again. This tunnel is taking me places, I know it. I'm on to something here! A solution is around the corner, every passage gets me to thinking and then I reach a decision and take a corner and every corner takes me into a new direction and I have to start over again but not really.

Returning is not an option, I'm starting to forget where I'm coming from, which way I went, but the solution is nearer to the end than to the beginning anyway so I have to keep on going and be patient, persevere, but the thought tunnels are starting to wear me down.

They're not cool anymore. But cold. Relief I see an intersection with another passageway, running to my left and running to my right.

I feel the relief more than see it, as a warm breeze wafts through it, through my hairs, through my fingers. This is passion and it feels good.

There's bars that prevent me from going in, the only way I can go is straight ahead. Too much of this hot air would burn me anyway, the bars protect me.

Even if I wanted to go in I couldn't, so after enjoying a bit of warmth, I find myself walking further through my tunnels of thought, leaving behind the warmth of the passion passageway, looking for a little laugh, an answer maybe, to any question, take a pick, then take a another turn around another corner.

This goes on and on for I don't know how long until I reach a small room which I imagine is in the middle of all these tunnels.

I know what it is. A lonely, dark and cold and all other kinds of bad place, surrounded by tunnels of reasons and reasoning, circular and colliding.

There's a chair in the middle of the room where I could rest, but no, I can't sit down, I'm too scared.

Too scared it's too late. I turn around, run run run back out. Tap tap tap through the tunnels. Flick flick flick through the pages. They burn my fingers and soothe my soul.

A flower in a shoe. Upon leaving the tunnel system, back into the alleyway, I fish some stars out of my pocket. If you throw them high enough, they can warm up planets and souls.

One, two, three, four, five. I throw them in the tunnels I hold so dear, hoping they bring warmth to the laughter and light to the questions.

Thank you, "A Scanner Darkly", for having me as your guest. Oct 18, carol. Shelves: classic , awards , male-lead , mindbender.

I've started and restarted this review a number of times. Take moderate amounts of the drug of your choice recommend one with highly hallucinogenic and paranoiac qualities 2.

Allow to simmer while reading Less Than Zero 3. Stir in a random amount of a second drug preferably one with potential for permanent I've started and restarted this review a number of times.

Stir in a random amount of a second drug preferably one with potential for permanent brain damage--current versions of the recipe recommend bath salts 4.

Allow to cook in brain pan on high heat 5. Watch Rush, the movie. Rinse and repeat until brain fully cooked The literary critic: Wandering, borderline incoherent narrative.

Half-hearted attempt to tack on conspiracy theory at the end, which might have been effective had there been more building earlier.

The story did surprise me in a couple of places, notably view spoiler [Luckman's unintentional drug trip hide spoiler ] which, while genius, does miss the consequence point he seems to want to make; and in the plot twist at the very end.

That said, character creation was brilliant. Each has his own way of interacting with drugs, his own purpose and own experience, and the intersections were fascinating.

Barris with his experimental genius. Luckman with his pursuit of pleasure, Donna with her strangely drawn and arbitrary drug-use lines ha-ha , and Charles Freck with his sad effort to self-medicate mental illness.

I'm sure several of the conversations came out of real life; they are too absurd not to. The psychological evaluation sections were interesting, and a clever device to give the reader insight into the world and Arctor, although the mumbo-science passed through my own tired brain.

Stylistically, the language was essentially prosaic, but occasionally a phrase would catch my attention and stop me in my tracks with meaning: "It will be a hindsight I won't even get to have.

Somebody else will have to have it for me. Under very specialized conditions, such as today. I get PKD and his motivations, I really do.

His Author's Note was quite powerful, especially when he says "these people wanted to keep having a good time forever. Had he done so, my sympathy for the characters would have been greater and my connection to the story deeper.

I would have enjoyed it more if there had been more than the tiniest shred of redemption, some elements of joy and abandon to show the sheer delight of the "children playing in the street.

View all 20 comments. Jan 20, notgettingenough rated it it was amazing Shelves: science-fiction , sociology , modern-lit , science-sort-of.

I had a whole lot of fun reviewing this Worryingly for Fred, the I had a whole lot of fun reviewing this Worryingly for Fred, the results of divided visual field and embedded figures tests suggest that his cortical hemispheres are becoming functionally separate, as they gradually lose the ability to communicate and fail to integrate information.

Far from being a fantastical notion of a far-flung plot, the idea that psychosis might result from a disengagement of the hemispheres was subsequently discussed in the scientific literature and is still influential today.

Although the resemblances between psychosis and the effects of split-brain operations are no longer regarded so highly, clear evidence for differences in the structure and function of the hemispheres in psychosis remains Gur and Chin, ; Pantelis et al.

Perhaps ironically, ideas that many people might have dismissed as imaginative plot, turned out to be reasonable and well informed scientific speculation.

It is from Bell, V. Dick's novel "A Scanner Darkly". The Psychologist, 19 8 , Science fiction classic from that explores the complex and ultimately deadly interplay between capitalism, surveillance, mental illness and drug addiction, predicting the much more corporate controlled, disciplinary, panoptical, drugged society we live in today.

It reveals the absurdity and hypocrisy of what would become known as the "war on drugs," as it uncovers the corporate roots of the whole cynical enterprise.

One of my all-time favorites. I'm not easily impressed when it comes to science fiction. I love the genre, yet I hate where the genre has gone, either becoming rip offs of older, superior material, or YA romps that focus on teenage drama rather than the ideas that ma EDITED REVIEW I've been planning to re-review this book, but it seems that a lot of people really enjoy the old review I love the genre, yet I hate where the genre has gone, either becoming rip offs of older, superior material, or YA romps that focus on teenage drama rather than the ideas that make science fiction so great, though I've seen authors such as Andy Weir who've managed to break that mold and try something new, but I have to search long and hard for those books and even Weir can't seem to escape his flaws.

But then there's authors like PKD who reminds me why I love science fiction so much. He's one who quite literally cracks my head open with the twists and turns that define his work.

But, unlike VALIS, Scanner is much more focused and straight-forward, getting weird but not losing sight of the story asides from a few tangents.

It's true that he had a big role in starting the New Wave movement, but PKD was really the one who planted the seeds in the garden that would become the New Wave.

But unlike Moorcock, who wants to get rid of the old tropes of classic science fiction and try something new, PKD embraces the tropes of old science fiction, while not being afraid to try something new with his work.

Dick's work is more personal, while also spilling out imagination on every page. As for the book itself, I'd describe it as a much more somber and reflective version of Hunter S.

Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. But while Thompson revels in the chaos of living in the moment and satirizes it, PKD is a somber old man, having lost many friends to 'living in the moment' in the form of drugs, as he attempts to reach out to his audience and warn them that drugs aren't cool, and he's not telling you this because he's the concerned parent that wants to keep you safe, he's telling you because he lived it, in fact to put it in his own words You would call that not a disease but an error in judgment.

When a bunch of people begin to do it, it is a social error, a life-style. It is, then, only a speeding up, an intensifying, of the ordinary human existence.

It is not different from your life-style, it is only faster. It all takes place in days or weeks or months instead of years.

But that is a mistake if the cash is a penny and the credit a whole lifetime. Dick knew that it was too late for him in the sense that the drugs and his increasing mental illness was taking its toll on him, but at least he wanted to tell other people of his and so many other people's stories, in a way to where it wasn't his story, but at the same time it was.

As he put it. Let them all play again, in some other way, and let them be happy. View all 9 comments. Dec 02, David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party rated it it was amazing Shelves: reads , whoa-thats-messed-up , cyberpunk , science-fiction.

A dark, haunting masterpiece. Phillip K Dick's A Scanner Darkly follows the journey of Bob Arctor, an undercover police officer code-named "Fred" trying to ingratiate himself into the drug culture in an attempt to bring down the suppliers of Substance D, a highly addictive mind-altering drug that can eventually cause permanent brain damage.

Tragically, Arctor himself becomes an addict, first only taking Substance D to earn the tr A dark, haunting masterpiece. Tragically, Arctor himself becomes an addict, first only taking Substance D to earn the trust of the people he's trying to take down, then taking it more and more to relieve the stress of his job.

Eventually, Substance D poisons his mind to the point that he truly believes "Fred" and Bob Arctor are two separate people!

What follows is a sad but compelling portrait of a sympathetic hero's slow descent into madness. What makes this book so powerful is that PKD does such a masterful job of detailing the horrors of drug addiction.

This book is a classic example of "show, don't tell". PKD doesn't simply hold us by the hand and tell us that using drugs is wrong.

Instead, we watch the slow burn going on inside Bob Arctor's mind. Arctor becomes increasingly paranoid.

He begins to suffer hallucinations and time distortion. Random thoughts having nothing to do with current events start popping up in Arctor's narrative with no explanation.

And what makes this even more jarring is that while we understand what is happening to Arctor, he does not. By giving us a direct view into Arctor's slowly deteriorating mind, PKD perfectly depicts just how tragic the life of a drug addict truly is.

A book with subject matter this bleak would be hard to get through without any lighter moments. Fortunately, PKD manages to inject a lot of dark humor throughout the story, most of which comes from Bob Arctor's bizarre roommate, Jim Barris.

From his invention of "the world's loudest silencer", to his rather unique line of deductive reasoning in determining that his forgetting to turn on a tape recorder proves there was an intruder in the house, Mr.

Barris provides laugh-out-loud moments that are far funnier than most books you'll find in the "humor" section.

Die Klapperschlange. Continue reading durch die Droge völlig zerstörte Bob Arctor eignet sich dafür nach der langen Vorbereitung am besten und wird über sogenannte psychologische Untersuchungen darauf vorbereitet, obwohl Donna nachträglich Bedenken zeigt, dass es nicht gerecht sei, einen Unfreiwilligen dafür zu opfern. Trending: Meist diskutierte Filme. FSK Hauptthema des in Teilen autobiografischen Romans ist der Drogenkonsum und die dadurch bewirkten Zerstörungen der Persönlichkeit. Er kämpft gegen die Modedroge "Substance D", click here zu Persönlichkeitsspaltung führt. Schauspielerinnen und Schauspieler. Visa-Nummer. August erfolgte der Kinostart in Österreich. Kino fГјr kinder Chester Prince. Verleiher Warner Bros.

Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews.

Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. An undercover cop in a not-too-distant future becomes involved with a dangerous new drug and begins to lose his own identity as a result.

Director: Richard Linklater. Writers: Philip K. Dick novel , Richard Linklater screenplay. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist.

From metacritic. What's New on Prime Video in June. Best of: Science Fiction. Use the HTML below.

You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Rory Cochrane Charles Freck Robert Downey Jr.

James Barris Mitch Baker Bob Arctor Sean Allen Voice from Headquarters voice Steven Chester Prince Cop Winona Ryder Donna Hawthorne Natasha Janina Valdez Waitress as Natasha Valdez Mark Turner Ernie Luckman Chamblee Ferguson Medical Deputy 2 Angela Rawna Medical Deputy 1 Eliza Stevens Arctor's Daughter 1 Sarah Menchaca Learn more More Like This.

Waking Life Animation Drama Fantasy. Slacker Comedy Drama. While posing as a drug user, Arctor becomes addicted to "Substance D" also referred to as "Slow Death", "Death" or "D" , a powerful psychoactive drug.

A conflict is Arctor's love for Donna, a drug dealer, through whom he intends to identify high-level dealers of Substance D.

When performing his work as an undercover agent, Arctor goes by the name "Fred" and wears a "scramble suit" that conceals his identity from other officers.

Then he is able to sit in a police facility and observe his housemates through "holo-scanners", audio-visual surveillance devices that are placed throughout the house.

Arctor's use of the drug causes the two hemispheres of his brain to function independently or "compete". When Arctor sees himself in the videos saved by the scanners, he does not realize that it is him.

Through a series of drug and psychological tests, Arctor's superiors at work discover that his addiction has made him incapable of performing his job as a narcotics agent.

They do not know his identity because he wears the scramble suit, but when his police supervisor suggests to him that he might be Bob Arctor, he is confused and thinks it cannot be possible.

Donna takes Arctor to "New-Path", a rehabilitation clinic , just as Arctor begins to experience the symptoms of Substance D withdrawal.

It is revealed that Donna has been a narcotics agent all along, working as part of a police operation to infiltrate New-Path and determine its funding source.

Without his knowledge, Arctor has been selected to penetrate the organization. As part of the rehab program, Arctor is renamed "Bruce" and forced to participate in cruel group-dynamic games, intended to break the will of the patients.

The story ends with Bruce working at a New-Path farming commune, where he is suffering from a serious neurocognitive deficit, after withdrawing from Substance D.

Although considered by his handlers to be nothing more than a walking shell of a man, "Bruce" manages to spot rows of blue flowers growing hidden among rows of corn and realizes that the blue flowers are Mors ontologica , the source of Substance D.

The book ends with Bruce hiding a flower in his shoe to give to his "friends"—undercover police agents posing as recovering addicts at the Los Angeles New-Path facility—on Thanksgiving.

A Scanner Darkly is a fictionalized account of real events , based on Dick's experiences in the s drug culture. Between mid when his fourth wife Nancy left him and mid, Dick lived semi-communally with a rotating group of mostly teenage drug users at his home in Marin County , described in a letter as being located at Hacienda Way, Santa Venetia.

I got mixed up with a lot of street people, just to have somebody to fill the house. She left me with a four-bedroom, two-bathroom house and nobody living in it but me.

So I just filled it with street people and I got mixed up with a lot of people who were into drugs. During this period, the author ceased writing completely and became fully dependent upon amphetamines , which he had been using intermittently for many years.

The character of Donna was inspired by an older teenager who became associated with Dick sometime in ; though they never became lovers, the woman was his principal female companion until early , when Dick left for Canada to deliver a speech to a Vancouver science fiction convention.

This speech, " The Android and the Human ", served as the basis for many of the recurring themes and motifs in the ensuing novel.

Another turning point in this timeframe for Dick is the alleged burglary of his home and theft of his papers. After delivering "The Android and the Human", Dick became a participant in X-Kalay a Canadian Synanon -type recovery program , effortlessly convincing program caseworkers that he was nursing a heroin addiction to do so.

Dick's recovery program participation was portrayed in the posthumously released book The Dark Haired Girl a collection of letters and journals from this period, most of a romantic nature.

It was at X-Kalay, while doing publicity for the facility, that he devised the notion of rehab centers being used to secretly harvest drugs thus inspiring the book's New-Path clinics.

In the afterword Dick dedicates the book to those of his friends—he includes himself—who suffered debilitation or death as a result of their drug use.

Mirroring the epilogue are the involuntary goodbyes that occur throughout the story—the constant turnover and burn-out of young people that lived with Dick during those years.

A Scanner Darkly was one of the few Dick novels to gestate over a long period of time. The theme of darkness runs through literature as a metaphor for our fears.

As a society, we are so scared of insanity that we construct all kinds of guises to hide it from view: the lunatic, the criminal, the addict.

And with these illusions in place we pretend lunacy, crime and addiction aren't right there waiting for us should misfortune find us. A Scanner Darkly is about the fragility of our lives and the obscure horror of insanity.

In his later work, Dick explores what lies behind our fear of madness, and perhaps it's there that his work becomes true art.

But in A Scanner Darkly he drives us down into our deepest fears and leaves us there, in the darkness. Topics Philip K Dick Darkness in literature.

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